Tag Archives: RIP

Chuck Berry — RIP

“When I first heard Chuck Berry, I didn’t consider that he was black. I thought he was a hillbilly. Little did I know, he was a great poet, too. And there must have been some elitist power that had to … Continue reading

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Derek Walcott — RIP

Allusive but demotic, Derek Walcott was Robert Lowell’s truest heir and often surpassed the American poet in using geographic points to populate a topography of the soul. Walcott set many of his poems in St. Lucia, but during the late … Continue reading

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John Hurt — RIP

In 1998’s Love and Death on Long Island, John Hurt’s novelist explained how and to what degree forebears like Thomas Mann appreciated teen meat Jason Priestly as muses and bottoms. Erudite and expert, Hurt risked embarrassment; his rock-hewn features collapsed … Continue reading

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Nat Hentoff — RIP

What I’d read of Nat Hentoff’s in the last twenty years suggested he would have made a sterling mentor. A jazz critic of formidable erudition and prodigious output, Hentoff could have triumphed in any genre.

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‘In my house there’s a circle’ — George Michael RIP

In which we Single Jukeboxers wrote about George Michael, often quite well. My blurb for “Precious Box”: By 2004 George Michael was as welcome in America as Howard Dean, but even if Patience had sold in Faith-full bucket loads, I … Continue reading

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George Michael and ‘ queer plausible deniability’

When David Bowie died almost a year ago, I remember no eulogists arguing that his place in the rock canon wasn’t deserved. His acceptance began in the late nineties as a generation of Billy Corgans absorbed his sounds and wannabe … Continue reading

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Carrie Fisher – RIP

A vinegary wit, the product of a Hollywood upbringing that looked delicious to people who thought Eddie Fisher deserved what he got, an irony she exploited in Postcards from the Edge and Wishful Drinking. Other children of movie stars could … Continue reading

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George Michael: notes on a brilliant career

I’m happy with how my George Michael essay for Billboard turned out. I’ve had time to think about him since my first reevaluation in October. Because of space and thematic limitations I couldn’t fit a few other points. First, the … Continue reading

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The R&B thriller: Rod Temperton — RIP

One evening in his youth the lad from Cleethorpes, England saw older couples dancing on a newly waxed parquet floor. What elegance, what a sheen. At least I like to imagine so. Quincy Jones gave him the chance to score … Continue reading

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Kashif — RIP

For a couple years in the early eighties, the artist once known as Michael Jones bounced and ounced. Figuring out how to synthesize the rubbery bass lines of disco while adding a touch of Zapp-tastic crunch, Kashif would be immortal … Continue reading

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Curtis Hanson – RIP

In 1987 Curtis Hanson wrote and directed a thriller called The Bedroom Window. It boasted the very eighties cast of Elizabeth McGovern, Isabelle Huppert, and, uh, Steve Guttenberg. Three years later, Hanson released Bad Influence, a post-yuppie black comedy posing … Continue reading

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‘Most trends exist because they’re permitted to exist and have not been slaughtered’

The Believer published an interview with the late Edward Albee in 2013 that’s a minor masterpiece of sourness, and Albee’s right to be sour. <blockquoteEA: What is the MFA? JH: Master of Fine Arts degree. EA: I wasn’t aware of … Continue reading

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