Tag Archives: Film classics

Cold War masterpiece ‘Stalker’ gets fresh airing

A wish granted is not a life changed. In Stalker, the chance for three citizens of an industrial, quasi-totalitarian present to enter an out-of-time space called The Zone produces no satisfaction. Part of the joke in Andrei Tarkovsky’s beloved 1979 … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Movie Love #4

FIRST VIEWING It Comes At Night, dir. Trey Edward Shults (2017). Staying Vertical, dir. Alain Guiraudie (2017). Afterimage, dir. Andrzej Wadja (2016) Tout Va Bien, dir. Jean-Luc Godard (1972). By shooting the factory as if it were a set (a … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Best films of the 21st century – so far

Here is my response to A.O. Scott and Manohla Dargis’ much-abused list. We’ve got some overlap, although I left documentaries off because they deserve their own ranking; that’s where you’d find In Jackson Heights, The Gleaners, Capturing the Friedmans, Stories … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Best films of 1935

1. The 39 Steps (Alfred Hitchcock) 2. Alice Adams (George Stevens 3. Bride of Frankenstein (James Whale) 4. Sylvia Scarlett (George Cukor) 5. The Devil is a Woman (Josef von Sternberg) 6. A Night at the Opera (Sam Wood) 7. … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Best films of 1936

1. Modern Times (Charlie Chaplin) 2. A Day in the Country (Jean Renoir) 3. My Man Godfrey (Gregory La Cava) 4. Sabotage (Alfred Hitchcock) 5. Fury (Fritz Lang) 6. Dodsworth (William Wyler) 7. Come and Get It (Howard Hawks/William Wyler) … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Jonathan Demme – RIP

He loved quirks, often more than people, befitting a director who got his start as the delightful Roger Corman aficionado of Caged Heat and Crazy Mama. The cross-eyed lepidopterologist in The Silence of the Lambs, Mary Steenburgen’s squeal of delight … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

‘Rumble Fish’ remains a stylized, histrionic curio

Lurid, finding a visual correlative for its absurd if not hysterical take on sibling love and rivalry — no, not The Godfather. Rumble Fish makes Rocco and His Brothers look as spare and uninhabited as a Bresson film. In the … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

My favorite sci-fi flicks

“Films that question reality and regard existence as infinitely strange” is my definition of sci-fi cinema, which encompasses Krystof Kieslowski’s 1994 masterpiece and one of Woody Allen’s best and most prescient comedies. 1. Metropolis 2. Aliens 3. The Man Who … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Screenings #27

The Lost City of Z (Gray, 2017) 8/10 Get Out (Peele, 2017) 6/10 * Toni Erdmann (Ade, 2016) 9/10 Cameraperson (Anderson, 2016) 7/10 Frantz (Ozon, 2017) 7/10 Personal Shopper (Assayas, 2017) 7/10 Silence (Scorsese, 2016) 7/10 * Elle (Verhoeven, 2016) … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged | Leave a comment

Best films of 1938

Let’s hear it for one of my favorite movies and one of the subtlest of queer films. 1. Holiday (George Cukor) 2. La bete humaine (Jean Renoir) 3. The Lady Vanishes (Alfred Hitchcock) 4. Bringing Up Baby (Howard Hawks) 5. … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged | Leave a comment

Best in queer cinema

When I defined queerness and queerness in rock and pop this week, I implied that a space where members of the same gender could share desires, gratified and ungratified, was a prerequisite. George Cukor’s delicate, strange Holiday leapt to mind. … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Best films of 1939

1. The Rules of the Game (Jean Renoir) 2. Only Angels Have Wings (Howard Hawks) 3. Young Mr. Lincoln (John Ford) 4. The Wizard of Oz (Victor Fleming) 5. Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (Frank Capra) 6. Stagecoach (John Ford) … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged | Leave a comment