Tag Archives: Civil rights

Freaks and androgyny

In “The Misunderstood Ghost of James Baldwin,” Ismail Muhammad analyzes how writers have taken the James Baldwin most commensurate with their own obsessions. His hook is a review of Raoul Peck’s 2016 I Am Not Your Negro: But rather than … Continue reading

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To move as largely and freely as possible: I Am Not Your Negro

To suggest that white America is finally reckoning with James Baldwin is not to succumb to a liberal notion of “progress” so much as accepting a terrible knowledge: racial tensions are at their peak. Wounds thought salved bled afresh after … Continue reading

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‘Anything fishy should be highlighted’

Karen Richards, the most gullible member of All About Eve‘s central quartet (but not dumbest – Hugh Marlowe’s Lloyd Richards has the density of an anvil), once remarked on the title character’s “breaking the record for running, jumping, and standing gall.” … Continue reading

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‘A person does not lightly elect to oppose a society’ — Baton Rouge and St. Paul

By the time James Baldwin published No Name in the Street in 1972 the American left was heaving from the fissures created by a movement that had so rattled the political elites that not only had a fealty to exposing … Continue reading

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That old devil reverse racism

It pains me to have to keep posting the following explanation. About ten days ago I sent the Furies after an acquaintance who took to, where else, social media to decry Pride Weekend; the celebration in his eyes amounted to … Continue reading

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What voter ID laws have wrought

This story is about Eddie Lee Holloway, Jr. He lives in the United States of America. The following happened after Wisconsin enacted a new voter ID law five years ago: He brought his expired Illinois photo ID, birth certificate, and … Continue reading

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What Hillary got wrong — what we got wrong in school

I missed the Democratic town hall last night — I was watching Joan Crawford in Autumn Leaves, a terse sudster by Robert Aldrich in which the star’s beetle-like eyebrows persuade Cliff Robertson he’s not young enough to sex her on … Continue reading

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Rights vs might: ‘Give Us the Ballot’

“Do you think they are going to appoint someone with extensive civil rights experience to head that division?” Erwin Griswold said about protegé William Bradford Reynolds, chosen by Ronald Reagan to head the Civil Rights Division in 1981 and not … Continue reading

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The legacy of Wilsonism

As I posted today and earlier this week, Princeton students protesting the deification of Woodrow Wilson object to his discriminatory policies as president. Resegregating the federal government ended the sinecure on which middle class blacks had depended since the Gilded … Continue reading

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Tuning in only ‘when people have reached a breaking point’

One of the more cogent responses to the kerfuffle in Yale and the comm arts professor’s calling for goons at the height of the University of Missouri’s demonstrations: On point: The Yale philosopher Christopher Lebron has theorized the ways that … Continue reading

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NRO and courage

David French of NRO (I won’t link) has advice for University of Missouri students who, fresh off deposing a president and chancellor, are weasels for avoiding the press: The entire notion that these students need a “safe space” is a … Continue reading

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‘Economic justice is not – and has never been – sufficient to ensure racial justice’

As usual, the senator from Massachusetts treated her audience like adults: I have often spoken about how America built a great middle class. Coming out of the Great Depression, from the 1930s to the late 1970s, as GDP went up, … Continue reading

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