The stink of climate change

To buy property in South Florida is folly, and here is more proof:

By 2040, 64 percent of county septic tanks (more than 67,000) could have issues every year, affecting not only the people who rely on them for sewage treatment, but the region’s water supply and the health of anyone who wades through floodwaters.

“That’s a huge deal for a developed country in 2019 to have half of the septic tanks not functioning for part of the year,” said Miami Waterkeeper Executive Director Rachel Silverstein. “That is not acceptable.”

The news gets better too:

Miami Gardens, North Miami Beach, Palmetto Bay and Pinecrest have the most of any city, at about 5,000 each.

Some of those cities will see hundreds more septic tanks experiencing yearly failures within the decade, like North Miami Beach, which has 2,780 homes with septic tanks with periodic issues now. By 2030, that is expected to jump to 3,751.

The report did not forecast past 2040, when the region is expecting around 15 inches of sea rise, a number that is predicted to creep exponentially upward over the decades.

For years I’ve said that sea level rise doesn’t mean a wall of water will turn Gainesville into beachfront property. It will look like a series of small, expensive calamities; life in affected places will be increasingly unbearable. On peninsular land where property gets erected on thin land above porous limestone, septic tank malfunctions are just the most obvious of microaggresions.

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