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This is why the GOP wins elections and the Democrats do not:

In 2012, Americans for Tax Reform’s Grover Norquist described the ideal president as “a Republican with enough working digits to handle a pen” and “sign the legislation that has already been prepared.” In 2015, when Senate Republicans used procedural maneuvers to undermine a potential Democratic filibuster and vote to repeal the health-care law, it did not matter that President Obama’s White House stopped them: As the conservative advocacy group Heritage Action put it, the process was “a trial run for 2017, when we will hopefully have a President willing to sign a full repeal bill.”

“What I told our committees a year ago was: Assume you get the White House and Congress,” House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) told CNBC in a post-election interview last month. “Come 2018, what do you want to have accomplished?” Negotiations with the incoming Trump administration, he said, were mostly “on timeline, on an execution strategy.

Yeah but bipartisanship:

Some Republican lawmakers also want legislation that would stop courts from deferring to federal agencies’ interpretations of statutes — a practice known as “Chevron deference,” after the 1984 Supreme Court case that went against the energy company — and have them instead defer to Congress.

Republicans never stop, never rest. Regarding Democrats and liberals as poxes on the Republic, requiring swift extirpation, they are motivated by righteousness. Democrats, no matter their laudable leftward tilt in the last eighteen months, regard their enemies as people with whom they can negotiate in good faith; the Democrats are the true corporatists, which after thirty years of the Democratic Leadership Council and Wall Street’s endorsement of gay marriage makes delicious sense. More fatally, they regard the GOP as amenable to the sweetness of their reasons. Seeing as how I learned not to reason with morons only a couple years ago, take your shoes off, relax, and wait while Gainesville turns into beachfront property.