Tag Archives: rock criticism

“If punk means anything in 2014, it’s in empowering the Ashley Monroes and Isaiah Rashads of the world”

Scott Woods performs an invaluable service by creating a one stop shopping site for all things Greil Marcus, with the hopes of ranking with Robert Christgau’s as an online resource for an invaluable and essential rock critic. In 2002 I … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Torture comes and torture goes: David Bowie’s “Tonight”

“Without a doubt and by some stretch, the worst of the three hundred and one records” that Marcello Carlin and listening partner Lena have reviewed. It makes Let’s Dance sound like Swordfishtrombones, he writes. And those are the most hedged … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

The drama that you’re craving: Sleater-Kinney

Rob Sheffield’s nine or ten out of ten review in Details published in the spring of 1997 introduced me to Sleater-Kinney. Unacquainted with Liliput, Essential Logic, Public Image Ltd, and the most violent aspects of post punk, I had no … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Love and a question

A day after my weekend at EMP Pop Conference in Seattle, I was reassured: rock criticism remains as thoughtful and febrile as ever. Contentious too. Panelists and listeners batted around the differences between “archiving” and “curating” at one session (me: … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Five years! Five years!

To paraphrase what my fellow editors of The Singles Jukebox wrote to commemorate our fifth anniversary as an independent entity would be redundant, so let me instead laud the by now millions of words we’ve written since 2009 in the … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

“The critic is always being swallowed up by the creative artist”

In a busy week for rockcrit as social media force, two pieces enraged and engaged the cognoscenti: the first questioned the musical knowledge of rock critics, the second mocked the idea of intelligent criticism of unfamiliar genres (I will not … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 4 Comments

I really really really really really zig-a-zig-ahh: Spice Girls’ “Wannabe”

Tom Ewing arrives at Spice Girls’ “Wannabe,” a single whose impact in America paled beside what the British experienced. Spicemania wasn’t an American phenomenon; we could barely tell the Spices apart. A couple of facts: we got “Wannabe” almost six … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 3 Comments

Hey hey, my my, rockcrit will never die

This post has gotten play in the ever-shrinking sand trap known as professional rock criticism. I admit to my privilege. Without a spouse, children, and the burden of a job with inconvenient hours, I can pitch and accept assignments whenever … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

” I’m not a fan because Nothing Was the Same doesn’t want me as a fan”

What progress American culture has made in the acceptance of what was once tagged subversive gets reified by the rush to universality. A kind of affective fallacy, it demands fealty to a specious premise: “like” means “equal.” Without fail its … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Targets of scorn accorded their place

Carl Wilson: In recent years, most people, and critics in particular, have become more live-and-let-live about one another’s varying musical tastes. Teen-pop, dance music, metal, and even Phil Collins, to name a few frequent targets of scorn, are all accorded … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

The pleasure of hate, pt #456

Oh I long for the days when Rolling Stone ran long reviews of terrible albums by good bands: Blondie’s Autoamerican is a terrible album, but it’s bad in such an arcane, high-toned way that listening to it is perversely fascinating. … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

I’m your dog but not your pet: Parallel Lines

Clem Burke’s drumming on Parallel Lines by itself affirms the nullity of the tagline “Blondie is a Band.” The fills in “Heart of Glass” (when I decide not to change the station it’s thanks to those fills), the fervid pounding … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment